How Personal Leadership Prepares You To Become A Change Agent

September 27, 2020
September 27, 2020 Kylie Rowe

The way I see it, there are two ways we can respond to the rollercoaster that is 2020—either by avoiding it or embracing  it by becoming a change agent.

Because of my personal leadership philosophy, I choose the latter.

Throughout my life, I’ve embraced change as a way to propel my development. I’ve pursued new degrees, new career opportunities, new relationships, and new cities. It’s why my recent move from Las Vegas to Washington, D.C., the epicenter of change, in the middle of a global pandemic, less than 60 days before a presidential election, felt like the next logical step in my leadership evolution. It’s how I stay active as a change agent in my own life and my own business.

But, let’s be real, change can be hard, and it can be scary. We’re seeing that in our world every day. Without the foundation that personal leadership can give you, making big moves can be terrifying. However, if you can leverage personal leadership to help develop your resilience, self-reliance and self-confidence, then you can position yourself as a change agent in your own life and career.


What is a change agent?

Typically, a change agent is identified as a person or people who are part of an organizational shift. It’s someone who helps an organization transform and improve by spotting opportunities where change is necessary and crucial for growth. According to Michigan State University, effective change agents are flexible, open-minded, growth-oriented, priority and results-focused, good listeners and responsible. 

Sound familiar?

All of these qualities can be developed through a consistent practice and pursuit of personal leadership. Once you commit to taking an active leadership role in your own life, you develop the inner tools you need to navigate change for yourself and whatever organization you choose to help.


Creating change on your terms

Change scares us, but facing fear directly is what propels us through our personal and professional lives. 

If you or your organization want more—to expand, grow, and evolve to achieve goals in line with your vision—you’re also looking for change. The tricky thing is you have to be open to the unknown in order to get somewhere new. More often than not, change occurs whether we like it or not. The one constant in life is change. So how do we lead and respond with change?

One tool is a change navigation matrix I’ve developed. It helps individuals and organizations address transformations that they are either seeking, or those that are happening outside of their control.

Change you are seeking

Change you did not seek

Individual

How to prepare?

  • Consider why you are where you are. Why do you work, live and spend the time the way you do?
  • What are your personal values? What are your priorities in life? What are your goals in one year, five, ten? Does the time you spend align with your personal values?

What do you need?

  • Qualities: resilience, self-reliance, flexibility, bravery, self-confidence and commitment.
  • Resources: may be monetary, physical, emotional or spiritual.
  • Guidance from others who have made a similar change.

How to respond?

  • First, get grounded. Return to the principles of personal leadership and find your footing in your personal goals and vision.
  • Then, assess how this change impacts your goals and vision for your life.
  • Finally, make a plan for how to best address this change in a way that aligns with your priorities, values and goals.

What do you need?

  • Time to process the change.
  • Inner resources, such as patience, confidence, courage and introspection.
  • External resources, such as a business coach, therapist or other advisors.

Organizational

How to prepare?

  • Review business goals, objectives and key performance indicators (KPIs).
  • Define the change as it aligns with established business strategy.
  • Anticipate the impact of change—who it will affect people (including you) and how will it be received.
  • Identify change agents and involve them in the development of a communication strategy and feedback plan for stakeholders.

How do you motivate others?

  • Provide effective training and ongoing communication with a focus on building trust.
  • Leverage a diverse and representative group of change agents to implement a support structure such as counseling, mentorship or an open-door-policy.

What are the next steps?

  • Listen for feedback and communicate transparently.
  • Measure the impact against goals, objectives and KPIs.
  • Identify strategies to do this better and different in the future.

How to respond?

  • Identify the potential impacts of the change to your organization (and you) and how those could affect business goals, objectives and key performance indicators (KPIs).
  • Evaluate how the change aligns or does not align with established goals and seek a well-informed team to assist in a business strategy realignment if necessary.
  • Create a course of action to address the change in a way that aligns to new or established business strategy.

What do you need?

  • Insight and information to understand why the change is happening and look for ways to support or provide input to steer the impact of change in an ideal direction.

How do you motivate others?

  • Create transparency through communication and training with a focus on building trust.
  • Identify a diverse group of individuals who will weather the change and act as agents to protect the best interests of the organization.
  • Implement a support structure such as counseling, mentorship or an open-door-policy.

What are the next steps?

  • Listen for feedback and communicate transparently.
  • Measure the impact against goals, objectives and KPIs.
  • Identify strategies to do this better and different in the future.

Becoming your own change agent 

I’d like to change the lens and turn the idea of being a change agent inward. Leadership is an inside job, and so is change. If you can become your own inspiration and influence for thriving through ambiguity and uncertainty, then you can take that skill set and turn it outward to help others. 

Keep crushing it, and we’ll talk soon.

Kylie

If you want to become your own change agent, or want to empower individuals in your organization to do the same, email me at kylie@kylierowe.com or text me at 775-250-1152. We’ll talk more about how to unlock the best version of yourself even in the face of change. 

LET'S GET IT!

Power up your leadership
with Kylie Rowe.

Contact Me

Cell: 775.250.1152
Email: kylie@kylierowe.com

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© 2020 Kylie Rowe. Site By Design on Edge

LET'S GET IT!

Power up your leadership
with Kylie Rowe.

Contact Me

Cell: 775.250.1152
Email: kylie@kylierowe.com

Receive My Newsletter


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Kylie Rowe Co., 4471 Dean Martin, LAS VEGAS, NV, 89103, https://kylierowe.com/. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Social

© 2020 Kylie Rowe. Site By Design on Edge

LET'S GET IT!

Power up your leadership
with Kylie Rowe.

Contact Me

Cell: 775.250.1152
Email: kylie@kylierowe.com

Social

Receive My Newsletter


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Kylie Rowe Co., 4471 Dean Martin, LAS VEGAS, NV, 89103, https://kylierowe.com/. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
© 2020 Kylie Rowe.
Site By Design on Edge
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